The Tucking Masterpost (Please signal boost!)(TW for discussion and some images of genitals)

anarcholesbianism:

Hi! Are you a CAMAB transfeminine person who’s sick of only ever seeing resources for CAFAB trans people on your dash? Are you just coming out to yourself and struggling with Peak Dysphoria? Are you a CAFAB trans person who wants to support the people above? Then here’s a post for you!

This is a post about tucking!

Wait Erika, what the fuck is a tuck?

Glad you asked! For those who don’t know, tucking is a technique for achieving a flat groin area. It’s a time-honored tool of CAMAB trans feminine people but, unfortunately, the tradition doesn’t seem to have been communicated very effectively to the current generation. 

So what’s the point of tucking?

Tucking has lots of awesome benefits! These include:

  • Being able to wear pants & shorts marketed to women more comfortably
  • Seeing yourself with a flat front often reduces dysphoria (it did for me!)
  • Referring to the previous bullet, it is one of the easiest ways to lessen your dysphoria when you’re still closeted, since you can wear a tuck under your normal pants/shorts and no one has to know
  • It can help us reduce some of the risk of being outed in public

Oh neat. How do I tuck?

The basics of tucking goes like this:

  • Push the testicles up into the inguinal canals
  • Pull the rest of the junk between the legs
  • Secure the arrangement with very tight underwear (or some other method)

Wait wait wait… What the hell is an inguinal canal?

Alright, so…. this is gonna require some body exploration on your part if you can stomach it. Basically, the inguinal canals are little tunnels in your pelvis above the testicles. If you push your testicles directly up into your body from their resting position, they should slide pretty neatly into the inguinal canals.

image

Yeah… this is what the TW was mostly for. Sorry, but the visual is helpful.

Ok…. So how do I secure it all in place?

Ok so first thing’s first: do not use duct tape. A lot of tutorials online (particularly ones for and by drag queens) recommend using duct tape, but that shit hurts and it’s super unnecessary!

Instead you need two things:

  1. A tight pair of panties (preferably more, so you can do this frequently without wearing the same undies every day)
  2. Control briefs

…. Control briefs?

I know, I know, so many new words tonight! Ever heard Spanx products? They’re mainly marketed to cis women for “tummy control”, but they have another awesome use as well - tucking! Here’s an example at Target.com (you should be able to find them at any store that sells women’s underwear, but if you’re afraid to go buy them in the store that pair is pretty cheap and you can order it online if you’re in the U.S.)

If you get the right size of control briefs (I would recommend buying a size down) they should fit very snugly over your junk. To hold your tuck in place, simply hold it between your legs, pull up your undies all the way, and pull the control briefs over them. Assuming you’ve pulled everything up as much as possible and kept everything tucked between your legs correctly, you should now have a snug and smooth tuck! Congrats!!!!!!

But wait, I can’t get that stuff! What do I do???????

Hey, that’s ok! Couple of ideas here:

  • Get a pair of tights (possibly old ones from a friend) and cut off everything but the stretchy part at the top. Congrats! Those are basically control briefs (albeit kinda messy ones)
  • Contact me and I’ll try to get you a pair of those control briefs from Target (if you live outside the US im sure we can find another website)

Ok…. So is there anything I should worry about with the tuck?

Unfortunately, yeah - mainly discomfort. Here’s a few ways discomfort occurs when tucking and how to avoid it:

  • After a few hours of tucking (varies depending on how active you are) things are probably gonna start to feel a little out of place. Part of the prevention here is practicing lots to get as tight a tuck as possible. Other than that, it’s something you’ll have to get kind of used to dealing with - I usually excuse myself to the bathroom when a tuck becomes too uncomfortable and fix it in the stall.
  • After even more hours you’re going to feel a pretty general aching. Much as people who bind shouldn’t do that for too long, you shouldn’t tuck for too long at once. Usually 4-8 hours (again, depending upon activity level as well as experience) is gonna be all you can stand before getting some longer lasting aching. I don’t know if there’s any long-term harm that can occur from tucking too long, but it’s best if you’re not the first to find out.
  • Generally I find that more & longer pubic hair can cause discomfort and generally make your tuck less effective. Definitely look into shaving down there, or at least trimming up a little bit if you don’t already (I’m not going to go into details about pubic shaving but send me a message if you need help in that department).

Congrats! You now know how to tuck! Go get those cute white capris you saw at Macy’s the other day and ROCK that shit!

If you have any questions or need additional help, feel free to send me an ask. If you have any additional suggestions to add to this post, please go ahead and reblog it with comment or send me a message about it!

Wikihow also has a good article on the topic to check out for some more visuals! (Make sure to skip to the “Tuck without Tape” section)

Please, make this post as popular as possible. CAFAB trans folks all have so much info about binding, but so many CAMAB trans feminine folk don’t know about tucking and could use the info!

Let’s stop claiming that certain genders and sexualities “reinforce the gender binary.” In the past, that tactic has been used to dismiss butches and femmes, bisexuals, trans folks and our partners, and feminine people of every persuasion. Gender isn’t simply some faucet that we can turn on and off in order to appease other people, whether they be heterosexist bigots or queerer-than-thou hipsters. How about this: Let’s stop pretending that we have all the answers because when it comes to gender, none of us is fucking omniscient.
Julia Serano, Excluded
jackrad:

good news for trans women & other trans female spectrum folx and those of us who like to have sex with them:
the once super hard to get ahold of “brazen: trans women safer sex guide” by morgan m page (put out by the 519) is now available for download in pdf form!
this is a super important and awesome resource and i’m not really aware of anything else like it out there—i learned a lot of important (and also sexy) stuff reading it and now you can too!

jackrad:

good news for trans women & other trans female spectrum folx and those of us who like to have sex with them:

the once super hard to get ahold of “brazen: trans women safer sex guide” by morgan m page (put out by the 519) is now available for download in pdf form!

this is a super important and awesome resource and i’m not really aware of anything else like it out there—i learned a lot of important (and also sexy) stuff reading it and now you can too!

Reblogged from keepyoustill-deactivated2012091

ryansallans:

Wearing my new t-shirt designed and distributed by blitztrans.org. It was great to meet them and many other awesome organizations and people at the Philadelphia Trans-Health Conference last week. If you haven’t visited their site yet and you are trans identified or a partner of someone trans….do it now!

ryansallans:

Wearing my new t-shirt designed and distributed by blitztrans.org. It was great to meet them and many other awesome organizations and people at the Philadelphia Trans-Health Conference last week. If you haven’t visited their site yet and you are trans identified or a partner of someone trans….do it now!

Reblogged from ryansallans

genderedintelligence:

In conjunction with the LGBT Consortium, Gendered Intelligence has produced a ‘A guide for parents and family members of trans people in the UK’. We hope that this might offer parents and family members some information about what it means to be trans, how it might feel as a parent or family member of a young trans person, and perhaps most importantly, a bit of advice on how to move forward after a young person has shared their trans identity with their family.
This booklet was compiled through a series of focus groups with parents and family members of young trans people. 
It is available online here, or you can order hard copies on our website.
Gendered Intelligence also runs ‘SOFFA’ youth group sessions every quarter, which are for significant others, family, friends and allies to come along with trans young people, meet other families of trans people and gain support. More details of our next SOFFA session will be posted soon on our tumblr.

genderedintelligence:

In conjunction with the LGBT Consortium, Gendered Intelligence has produced a ‘A guide for parents and family members of trans people in the UK’. We hope that this might offer parents and family members some information about what it means to be trans, how it might feel as a parent or family member of a young trans person, and perhaps most importantly, a bit of advice on how to move forward after a young person has shared their trans identity with their family.

This booklet was compiled through a series of focus groups with parents and family members of young trans people. 

It is available online here, or you can order hard copies on our website.

Gendered Intelligence also runs ‘SOFFA’ youth group sessions every quarter, which are for significant others, family, friends and allies to come along with trans young people, meet other families of trans people and gain support. More details of our next SOFFA session will be posted soon on our tumblr.

Reblogged from genderedintelligence

bibliofeminista:

Trans, gender variant and queer people face a lot of hassling when using public toilets. These experiences are the topic of Sheila Cavanagh’s new book, Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality and the Hygienic Imagination (2010). Her research is based on 100 interviews with lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersexed (LGBTI) people across North America. Cavanagh uses information from these interviews to consider the ways that bathroom architecture, rooted in colonialism, heterosexism and sexism, joins forces with rigid social regulation of the use of public space to “other” LGBTI bodies. Cavanagh argues that “bathroom architectures are based upon vertical lines and a wish to straighten things out.[…] Toilet training is about the delineation of the body, its genitals, orifices, and capacities to eject body fluids in time, rhythm, and tempo with a modern capitalist, heteronormative, and cissexist body politic” (208).
Click the image to read the rest of the article.

bibliofeminista:

Trans, gender variant and queer people face a lot of hassling when using public toilets. These experiences are the topic of Sheila Cavanagh’s new book, Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality and the Hygienic Imagination (2010). Her research is based on 100 interviews with lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersexed (LGBTI) people across North America. Cavanagh uses information from these interviews to consider the ways that bathroom architecture, rooted in colonialism, heterosexism and sexism, joins forces with rigid social regulation of the use of public space to “other” LGBTI bodies. Cavanagh argues that “bathroom architectures are based upon vertical lines and a wish to straighten things out.[…] Toilet training is about the delineation of the body, its genitals, orifices, and capacities to eject body fluids in time, rhythm, and tempo with a modern capitalist, heteronormative, and cissexist body politic” (208).

Click the image to read the rest of the article.

Reblogged from bibliofeminista